Monday, April 17, 2017

How important is Social Security?

How important is Social Security (and, by extension, Social Security Disability, since that is simply a person getting their Social Security early due to disability)?

This is how important:

"If Social Security income weren't available, the CBPP (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) estimates the senior poverty rate would be north of 40%!

Data from the Social Security Administration (SSA) appear to complement the CBPP's study. The SSA finds that 61% of retired workers rely on their monthly Social Security benefit to comprise at least half of their income.



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog).

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







Cutting Social Security tax...not a good idea.

Yes, as the article linked below states, if you cut payroll taxes (meaning that pesky fica deduction that comes out of a person's paycheck), then you cut the funding mechanism for Social Security and roughly half the country at retirement winds up with nothing, and nearly half of the rest winds up with much much less. The majority of Americans have less than $1000 on hand to deal with any kind of financial emergency, most don't have a defined retirement benefit, and half or more than half don't have a 401(k).

Social Security tax cuts.



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog).

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







How many get awarded disability benefits?

According to a recent article, "In 2002, 44.6 percent of applications were approved. Since 2002, approval rates have declined, with rates hovering around 32 percent since 2014."

This, of course, illustrates why it is important to submit an application that fully documents one's medical treatment sources and accurately lists all employment and job descriptions. And, it highlights the need for competent representation at the disability hearing level.

#howmanygetdisability?



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog).

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Out of touch journalists think disability benefits are an easy path

This comes from a conservative rag, National Review, and it once again espouses the seriously screwed up mentality that when people fight to get their disability benefits, they are somehow choosing the easy road and taking a copout. I don't know where these people get their beliefs but they've obviously never had to see a friend or relative go through years of disability, pain, financial ruin, and waiting for additional years as their disability claim moved like a snail through the bureaucratic system.

Here's what National Review had to say:

"The core of the American disability crisis is represented in the hard cases, not the easy frauds. A man used to have no choice. He had to keep at it, to look for work where he could find it. Now we give him options — the painful grind or a simpler path, one that promises a degree of stability in troubled times. All too many are choosing that simpler path. Perhaps that’s a choice that shouldn’t be so easy to make."

These people are out of touch, have no empathy for others, and have screwed up values.

The National Review article.



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog).

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







How many people are denied disability?

How many people are denied disability? The figures on this vary by state and by year. Historically, about 70 percent of applicants for SSD and SSI have been denied at the application level. In recent years, about 77 percent have been denied and 23 percent have been approved. Truly, for the last 3 decades, getting approved for disability has been fairly difficult...despite the fact that members of the U.S. Congress often claim the program is too easy, as well as costly.

This is what the Center for American Progress has to say:

"According to CAP, the center for American Progress, almost 80 percent of SSDI applicants are denied during the initial application and “thousands of applicants die” annually waiting to learn if they will receive assistance. Furthermore, CAP also found that disability recipients who are approved tend to skew older and had worked in physically demanding jobs before applying for benefits."



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog).

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.