Friday, May 27, 2016

Will Trump try to privatize and dismantle the Social Security and Social Security Disability systems?

This is not a political page. However, this page is about the disability process and system which makes this relevant. This story is not being played up in the media yet, and it is very interesting.

Background: Privatization has always been the goal of certain members of Congress who would like to get the U.S government out of the retirement and disability business. Unfortunately, that means turning the system over to other interests. In the case of Social Security retirement, that means turning it over to Wall street (because, obviously, getting rid of regular retirement plans and replacing them with 401(k)s was such a wonderful idea). In the case of disability, it would probably mean turning things over to the individual states, many of which have a long history of being hostile to such programs. As an example, statistics are very clear that in many southern states the denial rates on disability claims are significantly higher.

What makes this story especially interesting is that Mr. Trump has openly run on a promise not to attack the Social Security system. He has even gone so far as to say that he would like it expanded.

From the article:

"At last week's 2016 Fiscal Summit of the Peter G. Peterson Foundation, Clovis walked back Trump's pledge to leave Social Security and Medicare untouched. "After the administration has been in place, then we will start to take a look at all of the programs, including entitlement programs like Social Security and Medicare,” Clovis said, according to the Wall Street Journal. “We’ll start taking a hard look at those to start seeing what we can do in a bipartisan way." Trump campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks disputed that Clovis' words even "remotely" hinted at cuts. But he has argued strongly in the past for privatizing Social Security and Medicare as a way to cut their costs. In 2014, while running in Iowa for the U.S. Senate, Clovis told the Des Moines Register that he was "a strong believer in bringing private models to both Medicare and Social Security." For those "below the age of 45 .... we need new systems for both." He also favored block-granting Medicaid -- an "easy step," he said, that would allow "states to administer the program based on state needs." Medicaid experts have observed, however, that some states have taken advantage of flexibility in Medicaid eligibility to cut off all but the most destitute families. Alabama and Texas, for example, limit Medicaid to families earning less than 18% of the federal poverty level, or $3,629 a year for a family of three. Mashburn long has been an advocate of cutting social programs. In a 2012 interview with Ben Domenech of the right-wing Heartland Institute that Jilani unearthed, he also plumped for block-granting Medicaid. Notably, he also took a swipe at disability recipients, particularly children on the Supplemental Security Income disability program."



Link to page: Trump and Social Security



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog.

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







Improving the chance to Social Security Disability or SSI benefits

From the page:

Obviously, the medical records establish the existence of your condition or conditions. However, they also prove A) whether or not you are currently disabled (which is why SSA needs current medical records, not older than 90 days) and B) how far back you may have been disabled---which can have an immediate and dramatic effect on how much back pay you are entitled to and whether or not your waiting period for certain benefits (such as medicare, or the start of monthly payments) will already have been served.

For those who are unaware, Social Security Disability has a five month waiting period for benefits while medicare has a 24 month waiting period. Establishing through the medical records that your condition began long ago can effectively eliminate these waiting periods.

Link to page: Improving the chance to Social Security Disability or SSI benefits



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog).

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







Monday, May 09, 2016

Medical records are helpful to a disability case, but which medical records?

Not all records are helpful to a case. And, in this regard, I mean records from non-medical sources such as chiropractors, naturopaths, or anyone who is not licensed to practice medicine. Usually, this means anyone who does not have the professional privilege of writing prescriptions. This is why even though a nurse is a medical professional, they cannot supply records that by themselves that are especially useful to a disability case.

On the subject of chiropractors, Chiropractic medicine helps alleviate the pain of many thousands of patients. However, chiropractors are not considered medical treatment sources by the social security administration (they cannot write prescriptions) and their records are not used in deciding social security disability and SSI disability cases.

Tip: if you have back problems and are receiving treatment only from a chiropractor, you should, for the benefit of your case, consider seeking treatment from an M.D., possibly an orthopedist, and, perhaps, a pain specialist if you have ongoing and debilitating levels of pain.

On this subject, here are a few pages:

Medical Evidence Used on a Social Security Disability or SSI Claim

What happens if the Social Security disability examiner cannot find all the needed medical records?

How are medical records and work history used to determine a social security disability claim?

If You File For Social Security Disability How Far Back Will They Look At Your Medical Records?





I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog.

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







On Cheating people out of a fair disability hearing

This article deals with several things. First of all, with the backlog in disability claims, which is extreme and immoral. It is immoral IMO when elected representatives allow their constituents to needlessly suffer because they refuse to adequately fund a federal agency to a level that is necessary for the agency to do its job. What I am saying is that the problem for the last 20 years has been Congress. This article also points out that there are too few administrative law judges (this has been true for well well over a decade). Finally, It also points out that the attempt is being made to cheat claimants out of a fair remand hearing. For those who are unaware, a remand hearing is a second hearing by the same judge after the appeals council has determined that there was something wrong with the decision of the ALJ when he/she denied the case.

Social Security Administration Seeks Shortcut Through Massive Disability Backlog



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog.

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.







How Social Security decides claims, xrays, symptoms, filing a second claim

How Social Security decides claims

Social Security will base its decision to award medical disability benefits on an individual’s ability to engage in past work or "other" work activity. This decision is made by reviewing both a claimant's work history and a claimant's medical history--which is done by gathering a claimant's medical records. Note: Past work may potentially include any job done by the claimant in the fifteen year period prior to becoming disabled, as long as the job was performed long enough for the person to actually learn the duties of the job. "Other work" is potentially any type of job that a claimant may be thought capable of doing based on their education and job skills, and mediated by their current limitations.

When should you File for Disability benefits with the social security administration?



Social Security Disability and sending copies of XRAYs

Over the course of many years, I've had disability claimants send me their xrays. Not the xray reports, mind you, but the actual films. This has happened to me while I worked as a disability examiner and also in the course of disability representation.

Should you ever send your disability representative your xray films? No. Should you ever send the disability examiner who has been assigned to make the decison on your case your xray films? No. Should you take your xray films to the social security office when you go to apply for disability? Once again, the answer is no. Here's why---

When you apply for social security disability should you send copies of your xrays?



Put down all symptoms when filing for disability A person who is trying to win Social Security Disability or SSI disability benefits should list their various symptoms they have. They may also wish to list the effects of each condition they have. This would include any difficulty they have in certain physical areas such as the ability to sit, stand, walk, reach, bend, lift, carry, see, or hear. It would also include any difficulties they have in cognitive areas such as difficulty in concentrating, difficulty in remembering, difficulty in adhering to work schedules, etc.

When you apply for disability, mention all your medical symptoms



Filing a second disability claim

If your initial disability claim is denied, the best course to take is to file an appeal. The goal in filing a disability claim is to win your disability benefits, and you cannot do that if you are constantly filing initial disability claims that are denied. Despite this fact, there are many claimants who never utilize the appeal process and, instead, simply file new claim after new claim after new claim.

What Happens When You File A Second Social Security Disability Claim?



I am a former disability examiner and I publish the website Social Security Disability Resource Center, or SSDRC for short. I also maintain a facebook page for SSDRC (Social Security Disability Blog.

Archives for this blog.

Neither this blog, nor the facebook page, nor my website are affiliated with the Social Security Administration.