Tuesday, July 24, 2007



Social Security Disability Articles - Be careful where you get your info from

I found an article on Social Security Disability that appears on a personal website and which appears to be a reprint of an article that was submitted to AC.

Things that are correct in the article:

1. Most Social Security Disability attorneys will offer a free consultation --- Actually, any disability attorney that chooses to offer a consultation prior to being designated as your representative (the act of signing and submitting form SSA-1696 accomplishes this) will do this for free.

2. Roughly thirty to forty percent of all applications for social security disability or SSI disability are denied --- This is basically true. The denial rates actually vary by state and, nationally, about 30 percent of all claims are denied at this level.

3. Social Security will want to know about the jobs you've held for the last 15 years. Essentially true. This is called the relevant period. Essentially, this is an arbitrary determination by the social security administration (how they decided on 15 years, I haven't a clue) that any jobs worked within this period are relevant and subject to consideration when a claimant's past work is evaluated.

Things that are incorrect in the article:

1. Disability attorneys are paid 30 percent of your backpay as the fee for representation --- Incorrect.

The fee is equal to 25 percent of your disability backpay, currently capped to a maximum of $6000.

2. You shouldn't count on social security to request your older medical records since they will only request your most recent ones --- Incorrect. Disability examiners NEVER restrict their medical record requests to only your most recent visits. Typically, they request your records for years back. And they do this to cover themselves on the AOD (alleged onset date) supplied by a claimant on an application for social security disability or SSI.




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Disability in the Various States:

Texas Disability
California Disability
Tennessee Disability
Ohio Disability